HUD Publishes Income and Rent Limits for Multiple Programs, Including HOME

person A.J. Johnson today 04/29/2024

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) published income limits for seven programs on April 29, 2024. Income limits for the following programs go into effect on May 1, 2024:

  • Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
  • CDBG Disaster Recovery
  • Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)

Income limits for the following programs go into effect on June 1, 2024:

  • Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG)
  • Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)
  • HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME)
  • Housing Trust Fund (HTF)

HUD also published the 2024 rent limits for HOME and HTF, which take effect on June 1, 2024.

For the CDBG, CDBG-DR, and NSP programs, HUD is ensuring the accuracy of the information by updating the CPD Income Eligibility Calculator on May 1, 2024, to reflect these programs’ effective date. It's important to note that calculations based on the FY 2023 Income Limits data will only be accessible if downloaded from the calculator and saved to a user’s hard drive (or printed off) before May 1. Calculations completed on or after May 1 will use the FY 2024 Income Limits to determine eligibility.

Please note that for the rest of the CPD programs (e.g., ESG, HOPWA, HOME, HTF), the CPD Income Eligibility Calculator will continue to use FY 2023 Income Limits until the FY 2024 are in effect on June 1, 2024.

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